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Impressions Gallery

events: past

Film Screening: Heima

Wednesday 19 March 8.30pm 5.50/3.30 concessions

Film Screening at The National Media Museum, Bradford

Last year, in the endless magic hour of the Icelandic summer, Sigur Rós played a series of concerts around their homeland. Combining both the biggest and smallest shows of their career, the entire tour was filmed, and now provides a unique insight into one of the world’s shyest and least understood bands captured live in their natural habitat.

The culmination of more than a year spent promoting their hugely successful ‘Takk…’ album around the world, the Icelandic tour was free to all-comers and went largely unannounced. Playing in deserted fish factories, outsider art follies, far-flung community halls, sylvan fields, darkened caves and the hoofprint of Odin’s horse, Sleipnir*, the band reached an entirely new spectrum of the Icelandic population; young and old, ardent and merely quizzical, entirely by word-of-mouth.

The question of the way Sigur Rós’s music relates to, and is influenced by, their environment has been reduced to a journalistic cliché about glacial majesty and fire and ice, but there is no doubt that the band are inextricably linked to the land in which they were forged. And the decision to film this first-ever Sigur Rós film in Iceland was, in the end, irrestible.

Shot using a largely Icelandic crew (to minimise Eurovision-style scenic-wonder overload), ‘Heima’ - which means both “at home” and “homeland” - is an attempt to make a film every bit as big, beautiful and unfettered as a Sigur Rós album. As such it was always going to be something of a grand folie, but one, which taking in no fewer than 15 locations around Iceland (including the country’s largest ever concert at the band’s Reykjavik homecoming), is never less than epic in its ambition.

'One of the most beautiful audiovisual experiences of the year.'
Empire

'The band seemed charmingly without ego, quite at ease with the communities who showed up to hear their music, and their creativity and open attitude was at one with Iceland's ravishingly beautiful landscape.'
Peter Bradshaw, The Guardian

For further information and to book please visit www.nationalmediamuseum.org.uk or call the box office on 0870 70 10 200



* The huge horseshoe canyon at Ásbyrgi was, according to legend, formed by the hoofprint of this mythical beast.
To read more about the film Heima visit www.heima.co.uk

Heima

Heima